Getting a Shower

The head in this boat is big enough for a dedicated shower. Pressure hot and cold water will flow through a mixer, and up to a shower rose in the roof. All the plumbing is in Whale 15mm plastic tubing.

The mixer is fitted through the wall in the side of the head, just above the hand basin. The back of the mixer is in the back of the engine well for the starboard motor. Check the fittings that hang off the mixer so that the hoses line up with the most sympathetic bends in the tubing.

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Then the mixer is placed into a fitting in the back of the engine well, hoses fitted and screwed in.

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The hose to the shower rose runs up some hidden ducts in the corner of the cabin and comes out into the cavity between the deck and (the yet to be fitted) headlining. It’s a huge big low flow shower head, which we have positioned above the middle of the largest amount of floorspace.

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The headlining can not be fitted until all the deck fittings are secure. These fittings include the deck winches, pad-eyes, jammers, turning blocks and stanchions. All these fittings have triple layer backing plates under the deck to spread the load. The stanchion bases are through bolted and topped with 1″ 316SS tubing posts and fittings. Moundings on the deck to help secure these bases were made with epoxy resin and microballoons. Custom rails have been weleded, fitted, adjusted, refitted and readjusted. They are now ready to be replaced again with sealant on the deck. These photos show the preparations for the stanchions, one side of the boat with the final dry fit of the rails completed, and some photos of the backing blocks for the stanchion and chainplates.
Stanchion

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3 Responses to Getting a Shower

  1. Mark Harriss says:

    Hi Mate,

    Great job. Can I ask how mush it has cost so far and whether you would build this type of vessel again or is there anything you would change. I am looking at planning a build in the next few years.

    Regards,

    Mark

    • SeeBeeZee says:

      Hi Mark

      We had budgeted the job at $100K to lockup. I have kept the receipts but haven’t been updating the budget with actuals, so can’t say exactly where it is at, but I reckon we have come in under that. For most components, careful buying can save huge amounts.

      We keep talking about what we would do different next time. But we are getting old, and we are looking forward to sailing instead of building. But who knows? We have a big shed ready to go again. The changes next time would not be significant. Little things we see, like putting another light here, or adding a shelf there. Maybe leaving ports in the floor, instead of sealing it in, would be the biggest change. Seeing other boats under construction was our biggest help.

      It’s been fun. Good luck with your plans.

      Chris

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