Saloon Settee

Birgit has been busy with the sewing machine, and the saloon now has upholstered cushions.

We were lucky buy a roll of material that was intended to be used as the cloth on car seats. The cutbacks and closures in the local car manufacturing industries provided us a bargain priced roll of material in a nice neutral colour. We first made covers for our dining chairs in the house, and after a year and several washes, they still look like new.

The cushions themselves are from a couple of new foam mattresses. We found some very thin but dense foam mattresses that were marketed as rollup camping mattresses, and these have provided excellent cushions. The foam was carefully sculptured using an electric knife. Corners were carefully bevelled, and trigonometry was again put into action for the covers.

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Airtight

We have now achieved a huge milestone towards completing our boat. It is now airtight.

Today we attached the last of the cabin windows. The cockpit windows and door have been fitted for a while, but we had to wait until the non-skid deck paint was completed before the fixed windows on the cabin sides could be fitted.

The design specification for the windows had an option of either 10mm acrylic (perspex) or 6mm polycarbonate (lexan). The acrylic has a harder surface and is less prone to scratching, but the polycarbonate is much stronger so can be used in thinner lighter panels. Three sheets are required for the windows around the outside of the cabins, and a fourth required for the opening cockpit windows. We used one sheet of the 10mm acrylic for the opening windows on the turret front, as these will be handled and the scratch resistance will be a benefit. On the sides of the turret and the lower cabins, we used the 6mm polycarbonate, and for the opening windows inside the cockpit used 6mm acrylic.

Peter Snell, the designer, provided detailed instructions for the fitting of the windows. Those instructions were excellent, allowing us to complete a very messy job with no extra effort for cleanup. Because the job was so messy, there are no photos of the process. Both surfaces (the plastic sheet and the cabin side) had to be coated in a nice smooth bed of silicon. Silicon is used for this instead of the Sikaflex product used on the hard deckware, as the windows will need to be removed one day to replace any crazing or scratches. We applied the silicon out of the gun and smoothed it into concentric rings around the rim of the window. But by following the instructions and utilising the protective film on the sheets of plastic, we were able to clean up the excess silicon with no mess.

Point your mouse to each of the small photos below, and you will see the process of removing the protective film from the inside once the silicon had half set.

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Pool Fool

We bought a new motor for the dink, and it needs to be run in. I chose the closest piece of water to put some time on the motor. Boating’s fine anytime.

Of course the furry friend has to get involved whenever there is some fun to be had.

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This is a speeded-up preview to the longer video:



Click here to see the longer version at normal speed with audio commentary.

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Getting a Shower

The head in this boat is big enough for a dedicated shower. Pressure hot and cold water will flow through a mixer, and up to a shower rose in the roof. All the plumbing is in Whale 15mm plastic tubing.

The mixer is fitted through the wall in the side of the head, just above the hand basin. The back of the mixer is in the back of the engine well for the starboard motor. Check the fittings that hang off the mixer so that the hoses line up with the most sympathetic bends in the tubing.

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Then the mixer is placed into a fitting in the back of the engine well, hoses fitted and screwed in.

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The hose to the shower rose runs up some hidden ducts in the corner of the cabin and comes out into the cavity between the deck and (the yet to be fitted) headlining. It’s a huge big low flow shower head, which we have positioned above the middle of the largest amount of floorspace.

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The headlining can not be fitted until all the deck fittings are secure. These fittings include the deck winches, pad-eyes, jammers, turning blocks and stanchions. All these fittings have triple layer backing plates under the deck to spread the load. The stanchion bases are through bolted and topped with 1″ 316SS tubing posts and fittings. Moundings on the deck to help secure these bases were made with epoxy resin and microballoons. Custom rails have been weleded, fitted, adjusted, refitted and readjusted. They are now ready to be replaced again with sealant on the deck. These photos show the preparations for the stanchions, one side of the boat with the final dry fit of the rails completed, and some photos of the backing blocks for the stanchion and chainplates.
Stanchion

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Posted in Build Features, Head, Plumbing | 3 Comments

Fitout Continues

Grief kept me from updating this blog for a few months. Time eases the pain, and I have been asked to show some more photos.

I’ve been asked in person, in emails, in comments on this blog and on Facebook. So here are three new ones, and I promise to add more more regularly.

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Genoa Tracks

The genoa tracks are fitted to the forward end of the turret roof. Usually, these are through bolted on the roof, with the bolts washers and nuts being exposed on the lining of the saloon.

As we built the saloon roof lining unmarked and varnished, we wished to avoid the bolt heads being exposed.

Using the methods that the Gougeon Brothers describe in their I have glued the tracks down to the turret.

Here are some photos that were taken during the fitting.

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Rubbing Strakes

A design modification that I discussed with the designer are these rubbing strakes. Rather than painting a stripe along the upper chine, I chose to add a stripe of timber along the hulls. This provides a level of protection when coming along side a wharf.

This series of photos shows how we added these strakes after the hulls had been faired, but before painting. We sanded the strip of hull back to the glass cloth, and then glued the timber on with epoxy. It was secured from the inside with long screws coming all the way through the chine stringer and the hull plywood. Once glued, the edges were coved and painted, with the outside edge sanded and varnished.

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PWSBZ Launched

We have now launched the dinghy. It had a few test dips in the swimming pool, and was hung under the davits while it was still in pieces, but it is now finished.

It was glassed on the outside, and painted in and out with 2-pack polyurethane.

Rowlocks are fitted and tested. Balance is good with a variety of loads. It seems that we have good seat locations for any number of passengers up to 4, although a second set of rowlocks for the forward seat will improve balance for 2 people.

A test run with a 5hp outboard proved to be way more power than it requires, and we are waiting for our own new 3.6hp outboard.

I’d like to add a gunwale rubber around the outside to protect the yacht when coming along side.

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PeeWeeSeeBeeZee

What to do when you get bored? Build a boat!

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Before we finish painting, I want the dinghy finished so that we can create the chocks to hold it secure against the hull of SBZ. Those chocks will need to be painted, too.

Is PeeWee a suitable name? It is a 10 foot dinghy built in the same manner as SBZ; hoop pine frames and marine ply sheeting. The design was found on the web.

Posted in Dinghy | 7 Comments

Battery Delivery

There is a general level of excitement around here now that we will again have electricity.

For the boat, we had long ago decided on LiFePO4 Lithium Ion technology cells to store our power. Our house is also “off-grid” and utilises batteries for overnight electricity. But we have been struggling with old lead-acid batteries in the house, and so decided to buy two sets of identical cells; one for the boat and one for the house.

I bought the cells from a WA electric vehicle specialist. They balanced charged each of the cells and freighted them across the country.

Photos below are of the crates arriving, and cracking open the first sight of these Winston 400Ahr cells.

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